The Filmmaking Process with Nate Griffin (PCP101)

Nate Griffin talks to us today about the beginning of the filmmaking process.

00:00
February 23rd, 2016

Nate Griffin took a creative leap and built his own film company Grateful Inconvenience, Inc. which creates awesome content as a form of worship. With a full roster of directors, producers and set services, the company takes film ideas from conception to post-production. Yes, Nate knows his filmmaking stuff and he drops by to share it in this session of the Pro Church Podcast.

What’s In This Session?

  • Transition from live production to filmmaking (15:14)
  • Being the voice for the voiceless through film & the beginning of the filmmaking process (22:50)
  • The tension between manipulation and emotional storytelling in film (24:34)
  • The pre-production process (29:20)
  • A “bamboo structure” approach to filmmaking (34:50)
  • How did Nate gain such a massive Instagram following? (46:05)

Show Notes & Resources Mentioned

3 Instant Takeaways

  1. Leave some of your stories open-ended. Nate says it’s his job to tell a story but it’s not his job to tell people how to respond to it. Sometimes we are knocked over the head with commercialized, in-your-face film messages, but people engage better when they can come to their own conclusions. Leave room for freedom and the movement of the Spirit in people’s response to your art.
  2. Be thoughtful about the planning of your production to cut logistics. Logistics are ever-present and can drain the creativity and artistry from you work. Nate uses what he calls a “bamboo structure”: there’s a preplanned storyboard, a shooting schedule, a shotlist and B-roll locations — but everything can be quickly dismantled if necessary and easily bends to the wind of the unexpected.
  3. Micromanagement can kill a production. You have to trust the people on your team, especially if you chose your team. Let people function in their sweet spots. As a leader you can challenge and push appropriately, but know when to keep your mouth shut. Keep yourself involved in the creative process but never wield power for power’s sake.